moblog uk

Narrowboat 'wilvir'

by wilvir

user profile | dashboard | wilvir maps

Whispers on water - a photo journal of our life on the 'cut' dedicated to keeping family and friends informed of our whereabouts.

Tweet us @wilvir514

Helping to keep our waterways litter-free: www.litteraction.org.uk/narrowboat-wilvir

Drought, pollution and illegal fishing all threaten our waterways. Spotted something that looks wrong? See it, say it, save it. Call the Environment Agency (EA) Incident Hotline: 0800 80 70

Recent visitors

Friends

More...

rss rss feed

A Natural Wonder

Photo:
1. On the rise (mid photo you can see the approaching swell of the bore across the width of the river).
2. The crest of the bore reaches the top of the slipway.
3. The tide rises up the slipway.
4. The river is now about to broach the far bank.
5. I had been stood forward of the tree in the centre.
6. Flooded water meadows (the river is just off to the right).

For the past two mornings I have walked down to the River Severn to meet the incoming tide and stood in awe at the roar of the Severn Bore approaching and the sight of this mighty river fast rising to top-out at high tide.

I have to thank Barry and Pat for allowing me to watch this spectacular occurrence from the privacy of their slipway. As Barry said when I first approached him, 'If you've got the courage to stand on the high bank just to the right of the slipway as the bore approaches you'll get your feet wet'. So I did just that and watched the crest of the bore break twenty yards in front me as it rose above the bank and ran up the slipway like an approaching tsunami. I stood rooted to the spot trying to focus my camera on this natural wonder as it spilled over, swirled around my feet, and fell back down the bank to rejoin the main flow. Both awesome and scary.
As the river continued to rise, what was once my sanctuary quickly became a small island as the river overflowed the bank and began flooding where I was stood. The slipway was now underwater so it was time to retreat to higher ground as the river continued to rise, inundating the water meadows just upstream.

I've seen the bore on tv, but to see and experience this force of nature first-hand was breathtaking. Once the initial surge of the bore had passed, the power and increasing speed of the rising river, now flowing in the wrong direction, was incredible to watch and truly a sight to behold. Huge uprooted trees sped past heading upstream to Gloucester as if they were matchsticks.

Afterwards, walking back to the boat this morning, I pondered on the remarkable scenes I had just witnessed, and outwardly smiled to myself at the pleasure of being there and seeing what is one of the natural wonders of the world. It's just a shame the photos I took don't do it justice at all.
18th Oct 2012, 16:09   comments (1)

Sunset Over the Severn

(viewed 327 times)
18th Oct 2012, 00:07   comments (0)

A Misty Morn'

(viewed 471 times)
The promise of a beautiful day....

.......and later as promised.
14th Oct 2012, 10:58   comments (3)

The Day Draws to a Close

13th Oct 2012, 20:19   comments (0)

Treading Water (so to speak)

(viewed 430 times)
The Severn and Avon seemed to have been in cahoots for the past couple of weeks in their attempts to slow our progress to the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal, but we have at last managed to reach Gloucester Docks. We'd been at Upton-Upon-Severn for the past five days waiting for river levels to drop sufficiently for us to pass through Upper Lode Lock just south of Tewkesbury and on into Gloucester Docks, a distance of fourteen miles. Spring tides combined with already high river levels can make the approach to Gloucester lock a bit tricky, but the levels had dropped sufficiently to make the run down river and locking up into Gloucester Basin no problem whatsoever.
10th Oct 2012, 00:18   comments (0)

Ready to Sail

(viewed 460 times)
5th Oct 2012, 17:43   comments (0)

Asides - To Worcester and Beyond

Photo:
1. The view astern.
2. Tide-marks!
3. A majestic footbridge.
4. If the chimney had been taller!
5. Moored on the outside at Upton-Upon-Severn. Turning upstream to moor on the floating pontoon certainly tested my judgement of drift and rate of turn as we cut across the strong flow. Coming broadside against the flow, wilvir began to bounce as we powered out of the turn and upstream to tie-up at the pontoon. Great fun.
5th Oct 2012, 14:35   comments (2)

Going With the Flow

Photo:
1&2. Stourport-On-Severn canal basin narrow lock flooded.
3&4. Stourport-On-Severn canal basin narrow lock river level dropping to 'red/amber'.
5. Moored below 'The Angel' at Stourport-On-Severn.
6. Alone on the river - just perfect.

We left Stourport-On-Severn with the current this morning after having locked down onto the river below Stourport canal basin and waiting a further two days for the level to drop. With water levels on the rise again, we decided to make a move and set off downstream, carried along by a moderate to strong flow.

Passing through Worcester, all the visitor moorings below the racecourse were underwater. Apparently the flow is strong enough ahead of us to warrant southbound skippers having to sign an warning indemnity waiver out of Upper Lode Lock just south of Tewkesbury, which would put the boat at risk and invalidate our insurance policy for ignoring warnings.

After four locks and twenty-two miles, we're now safely moored at Upton-Upon-Severn to await weather updates and maybe a delay, as more heavy rain is forecast. The river doesn't seem to be going down anytime soon.
4th Oct 2012, 19:44   comments (2)